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John Bonham’s intricate drumming

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John Bonham’s intricate drumming


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    John Bonham’s intricate drumming

    John Bonham’s intricate drumming https://youtu.be/UvOm2oZRQIkView Source
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22 Comments


  1. jasonellis

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    That was great. As a Zeppelin fan, but completely a non-musician, that was truly interesting to watch. I am always in awe of artists like this. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

  2. djazzbass

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    I started playing bass guitar in 1989. It was the era of hair bands and guitar driven rock, and the bass in those songs was all but unintelligible. I got into music because as a scrawny 14 yr old I thought it would get me laid (ummm… it kinda did, so cheers for that).

    Anyway, about a year into my burgeoning music career I “discover” Led Zeppelin. I’d heard all their songs a million times on the radio, but never identified with them or listened to them intentionally. As a newly minted bassist, hearing John Paul Jones and his work (esp on LZII) was mind blowing and world changing. His work was light years ahead of any of the shitty hair band bassist I was listening to.

    So I start learning as much Led Zeppelin as I could. I eventually ended up in a LZ cover band. We all worshiped LZ, and each member of the band was convinced that his counterpart in LZ was simply the greatest musician to play that instrument in rock. Outwardly we all agreed with each other, but secretly I never really thought Bonham the greatest. I always thought that with the drummers, Bonham was the drummer in their favorite band, so that’s why they considered him “the best ever”. To be sure, he was a very good drummer, but I never thought he “the best” the way I though JPJ, Page and Plant were (respectively) the greatest bassist, guitarist, and singer ever. I mean, guys like Keith Moon and Neal Peart were way “drummier” than Bonham ever was.

    I decided to play bass at 14 because my older brother was a drummer and his band needed a bass player. But since I was 6 I really had a desire to play drums. So about 10 years or so ago I decided I was going to fulfill my lifelong dream I had of learning to play drums, and I bought a kit and started learning. After a couple months of rudiments and practice, I decided to maybe learn some easier songs. I’ll leave Rush and The Police for later, but how about some of those Led Zeppelin songs I always thought were fairly easy.

    That’s when the lightbulb went on. Holy shit. John Bonham’s drumming is simply insane. His rhythms, his bass pedal work, and his triplet fills (“Bonham triplets” – rack/floor/bass), the subtle syncopation – were just unbelievably complex and just blew me away with how complex and difficult his parts work. I couldn’t believe how much of an idiot I was back when I thought he was “OK, but not great”.

    The more I’ve really learned about drumming, the more I’ve realized that far from being the “only OK” musician in LZ, Bonham was probably the best of the best. I don’t think any member of LZ influenced future musicians on their instrument as much as Bonham did. While JPJ was great, his jazz influenced style of playing all but died out in the 80s when bassist simply played root notes of the guitarist. Page was certainly an influence, but just as much was Clapton and Hendrix. But Bonham… no one played like him before, and everyone played like him after. He changed everything about rock drumming.

    Reply

  3. Jake0Tron

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Great video, but I feel like the narrator was reaching a bit when he compared the 12/8 to the 4/4 in triplets… that’s literally what 12/8 is

    Reply

  4. SebbenandSebben

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    “Playing with the guitarist instead of the basist” that reminds me of Brann Dailor who says thats what he does more than anything. I’m sure Bonham was a big influence on him.

    Drummer for Mastodon

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CGuwr1v08o

    Reply

  5. xcalibre

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

  6. WeatherIsGreatUpHere

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    You had me at ‘John Bonham’.

    What a great video for an incredible musician.

    Reply

  7. DantesEdmond

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    What John Bonham plays in “Fool in the Rain” is called a [Bernard Purdie Shuffle](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1j1_aeK6WA) or a variety of the beat. I don’t know if Purdie invented it but he definitely made it popular. You can hear it around the 3:50 mark in the video.

    It’s a great beat with a lot of depth.

    Reply

  8. indiana_jones_hat

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    I always thought some of those awkward beats were a mistake. It still throws me off a bit. Interesting how it was planned.

    Reply

  9. -JungleMonkey-

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Man I’m in the heat of my Led Zeppelin phase, and every time I listen to their music I get chills if I focus in on their drumming. It’s absolutely masterful but moreso, completely separates them from the genre at the time. It only added to this sort of “funk” & positive vibes, all of these small things put together that go unnoticed to the casual listener. Great video to help back up these ideas with some music ‘science.’

    My personal favorite is the Lemon Song which shows how much of a groove these guys were in.

    Reply

  10. ruttin_mudders

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Bonham was just absolutely amazing and a huge influence on my favorite drummer Danny Carey. I’d love to see a breakdown like this of some of Danny and Tool’s work.

    https://youtu.be/EnRBbZ6_kG8

    Reply

  11. golfingmadman

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    That’s a great video. Growing up listening to them, I always loved his drumming. Truly amazing the stuff he could do. I wish there were links to their songs featuring just his drums.

    Reply

  12. jhatput

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    As plant once said ” where would I be without bonzo?”

    Thanks for sharing

    Reply

  13. ChicoMarxism

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Great subject matter. This sub was in a bit of a slump, thanks for some wind in the sails /u/betweenyournostrils. I also was very surprised the YouTuber [Polyphonic](https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXkNod_JcH7PleOjwK_8rYQ) didn’t site Bonham’s masterwork in The Lemon Song. [Listen to him work with John Paul Jones here.](https://youtu.be/Zyhu2ysqKGk?t=4m33s) He just fucks shit up in the most amazing way.

    Reply

  14. stretch2000mm

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Never paid much attention to Zeppelin, but I gotta say, this video gives me a new appreciation. Going to have to give them a closer look now.

    Reply

  15. digitalbastard

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    > The Wonton Song

    lol

    Reply

  16. sineofthetimes

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    They were voted [best super group](http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/4669597.stm) in a poll in 2005. It’s like all the planets lined up when they found each other and decided to play.

    Reply

  17. maxkmiller

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Led Zeppelin is one of the finest rock groups of all time, and this comment isn’t meant to detract from them or John Bonham, but damn do I hate the time signature shifts on Black Dog, they just sound so bad and off. OP’s video claims “it’s good because it’s intentional,” but I still dislike it. What do you guys think?

    From Wikipedia:
    > Although it has an apparently simple drum pattern, the song’s complex, shifting time signature was intended to thwart cover bands from playing the song. Jones originally wanted the song recorded in 6/8 time but realised it was too complex to reproduce live. In live performances, John Bonham eliminated the 5/4 variation so that Plant could perform his a cappella vocal interludes and then have the instruments return together synchronized If the volume is turned up loud enough, Bonham can be heard tapping his sticks together before each riff. Page explained this in an interview with Guitar World magazine in 1993:

    > “He did that to keep time and to signal the band. We tried to eliminate most of them, but muting was much more difficult in those days than it is now.”

    Reply

  18. RootLocus

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    For me, John Bonham is one of the few drummers who’s beats are fundamental to the success of the musical phrasing they accompany. They may not be the flashiest or the most technical, but I feel they are among the most musical.

    Reply

  19. SirDigbyChknCaesar

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Playing with and against the guitar rather than the bass is something I picked up on years ago that made bands like Rush stand out. You don’t hear it too much these days in popular radio rock, maybe in bits and pieces, but it’s one thing that drew me in to Avenged Sevenfold before the Reverend’s sad passing. He took a lot of that intricate flair that Bonham began and brought it to a more modern and heavy tone that was still very melodic. I wish more bands like that shone through these days.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hg7lIkZdTPk

    One of my favorites from them. Sounds like he’s playing two drum kits at the same time.

    Reply

  20. 111is3

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    RemindMe! One day

    Reply

  21. Poet_of_Legends

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Saving for later…

    Reply

  22. aa24577

    August 4, 2017 at 10:51 am

    But Bonham is literally just copying what Jimmy Page is doing rhythmically

    Reply

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