The New Caledonian crow is a tool-using species of crow. These crows are some of the only non-primate animals known to invent new tools by modifying existing ones. New research suggests that they learn the usefulness of objects by playing with them, similar to the way human babies do. | Amazing Articles
World

The New Caledonian crow is a tool-using species of crow. These crows are some of the only non-primate animals known to invent new tools by modifying existing ones. New research suggests that they learn the usefulness of objects by playing with them, similar to the way human babies do.

- the new caledonian crow is a tool using species of crow these crows are some of the only non primate animals known to invent new tools by modifying existing ones new research suggests that they lear - The New Caledonian crow is a tool-using species of crow. These crows are some of the only non-primate animals known to invent new tools by modifying existing ones. New research suggests that they learn the usefulness of objects by playing with them, similar to the way human babies do.

The New Caledonian crow is a tool-using species of crow. These crows are some of the only non-primate animals known to invent new tools by modifying existing ones. New research suggests that they learn the usefulness of objects by playing with them, similar to the way human babies do.

Share this Story
Load More Related Articles
Load More By Zees
Load More In World

17 Comments


  1. aliaswhatshisface

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    I spent months writing an essay about these, and the concept of tool use in animals in general. New Caledonian crows are awesome, but one thing that turned up a fair amount in my reading was how absurd it is that we latch on to tool use, yet largely ignore nest building as a representation of intelligence. Nests aren’t considered tools (well, it depends on your definition, but I’m basing mine on Beck’s adapted definition from Shumaker et al. 2011), yet they are as or more physically complex than tools, often as cognitively complex and adaptable. Perhaps it is because tools were formerly seen as particularly ‘human’, while nests are ‘animal’, so we are less surprised by them.

    Bit of a ramble, it just reminded me of the subject. I love this sort of stuff.

    Reply

  2. sunburnedtourist

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    I just watched my cat steal some cat food out of the glass I use to serve it. I thought “wow she’s clever, like those crow videos”. Then I saw this. She ain’t so clever after all.

    Reply

  3. integritytime

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Not only that, New Caledonian Crows also transfer knowledge of their technology. Studies have shown that young NCCs know to [start toolmaking at the most recent variation rather than start from scratch.](https://www.researchgate.net/publication/222582268_Development_of_tool_use_in_New_Caledonian_crows_Inherited_action_patterns_and_social_influences)

    Reply

  4. Ultimatecheezer

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    When he pulled out the can it was strangely satisfying

    Reply

  5. MrsVotan

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Smartbirb!

    Reply

  6. QuietCakeBionics

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

  7. rea_lin

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Ohh I studied this (or a similar study) in psych once. There was two sticks. A curved and straight one.

    The male crow was trying to brute force his way in but couldn’t get his beak in, and wouldn’t let the female try. Eventually he gave up and the female crow used the curved tool, and successfully fished out worms.

    The male, seeing how it was done, stole the curved stick and used it until it broke. She took the straight one and fashioned it into a curved stick and ate the last worm. Neat huh.

    Reply

  8. TurkeyMushroom

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    How many years would they need to reach human level intelligence?

    Reply

  9. DatNorBoii

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    That is amazing! I love smart birds, especially crows! I’ve seen crows imitating us crossing the road using the zebra stripes, and it just amazes me

    Reply

  10. RavetcoFX

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    I wonder in a million years or so if they’ll develop an society not unlike our own

    Reply

  11. TaxDollarsHardAtWork

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Corvids are amazingly intelligent!

    Reply

  12. Logiccookie

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Very cawwducational!

    Reply

  13. jimmybrad

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    what happened to the old one?

    Reply

  14. MiscLeine

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    SNOW

    Reply

  15. darockerj

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Hey /u/UnidanX, get in here.

    Reply

  16. Robertroo

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    Something something jackdaw.

    Reply

  17. PteroStero

    October 1, 2017 at 3:41 pm

    It is very interesting how we could measure the amount of intelligence in some animal species compared to other species of the same kind, but we can’t use that for humans because it’s racist.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Tamal Ray’s grapefruit-glazed cheesecake recipe | The Sweet Spot | Life and style

A smoothly sweet dessert spiked with spiced grapefruit ...